Living with Wildlife

 

Coyote

 

Coyotes are part of a healthy ecosystem in Ontario. Learn how you can avoid attracting coyotes to your property and protect pets and livestock. 

 

Living with Coyotes  

 

Throughout Ontario, people and wild animals live side by side.

 

In most of Ontario, people share their neighbourhoods with raccoons, skunks, foxes, bats, birds, coyotes, white-tailed deer, and even moose and black bear. In some areas of central and northern Ontario, people also encounter wolves.

 

There are benefits to living near wild animals. Many people enjoy birds that visit their gardens. Bats consume millions of mosquitoes, and coyotes eat mice and rats. However, conflicts can arise when humans encroach on wildlife habitat and wild animals behave in ways that damage our property, cost us money, or endanger our health or safety.

 

Preventing Problems with Wildlife

 

Often the best way to prevent problems with wildlife is to make small changes on your property and in your actions. For example, removing sources of food, water and shelter will encourage animals to go elsewhere. 

 

To help you live with wildlife, see the links below on: 

 

how to prevent conflicts in situations where you may encounter wildlife
how to deal with common Ontario species of wildlife

 

 

The Role of the Ministry of Natural Resources in Managing Human/Wildlife Conflict


The Ministry of Natural Resources helps landowners and municipalities deal with human/wildlife conflict by making referrals to appropriate agencies and providing information on how to manage problem animals and how to hire a wildlife control agent.

 

The ministry provides the information that landowners need in order to lawfully kill coyotes that cause conflict. Municipalities may hire or employ licensed hunters or trappers to harvest furbearing mammals to help resolve human-wildlife conflicts within their municipal boundaries without obtaining approval from MNR. These hunters and trappers will be able to accept financial compensation from municipalities for their activities.

 

Ministry authorization must be obtained in specific circumstances for other species, including white-tailed deer or elk that are causing damage.

 

The ministry also works with community leaders to reduce preventable causes of human-bear conflict in Ontario through the Bear Wise Program.
 

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Where are you encountering wildlife?

 

 

 house
in your house
running dog
with family and pets
flowers
in yard or garden
cottage
at camp or cottage
 raccoon in garbage
in your garbage
 apple branch
in your crops
chicken
with your farm animals
road
on the road 
hiking
when enjoying the outdoors


 

 

What animals are you encountering?  

 

 

little brown bat
bats 
PDF (68 kb)
Black Bear
black bears
PDF (75 kb)
beaver
beavers
PDF (74 kb)
Canada goose
Canada geese
PDF (70 kb)
cormorant
cormorants
PDF (67 kb)
coyote
coyotes
PDF (658 kb)
crowe
crow and ravens
PDF (66 kb)
white-tailed deer
deer
PDF (65 kb)
Elk
elk 
PDF (69 kb)
Fox
foxes 
PDF (58 kb)
cougar
lynx, cougars 
PDF (70 kb)
Mouse
mice and rats
PDF (62 kb)
Moose
moose
PDF (65 kb)
opossum
opossums
PDF (70 kb)
pigeon
pigeons 
PDF (66 kb)
cottontail rabbit
rabbits 
PDF (70 kb)
raccoon
raccoons
PDF (57 kb)
striped skunk
skunks
PDF (69 kb)
Snake
snakes
PDF (71 kb)
Eastern grey squirrel
squirrels 
PDF (65 kb)
starling
starlings 
PDF (61 kb)
Wild Turkey
wild turkeys
PDF (77 kb)
Wolf
wolves
PDF (63 kb)
woodchuck, also known as groundhog
woodchucks 
PDF (72 kb)

 

 

 

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