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2008 News

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October 2008
TWO LOCAL HUNTERS FINED $9,000 FOR ILLEGAL MOOSE HUNTING

Two Kirkland Lake residents have been fined $9,000 after pleading guilty to various moose hunting offences under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act.

 

The first man was fined $4,000 and suspended from hunting moose for one year after earlier pleading guilty to hunting a bull moose without a licence, attaching his cow moose validation tag to a bull moose, and for abandoning flesh suitable for food from a second bull moose illegally harvested in which was concealed .

 

The second man was fined $5,000 and suspended from hunting moose for one year after pleading guilty to possessing illegally taken wildlife.

 

On October 18, 2006, the two men went moose hunting together in Barnet Township, located north of Kirkland Lake within Wildlife Management Unit 28.  One man shot a bull moose for which he didn’t have an adult validation tag. The two hunters then gutted the bull moose, and cut off the head and genitalia of the moose to disguise its gender. They tagged the bull moose carcass with the other man’s adult cow moose validation tag and transported it from the woods. 

 

The cases were heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Kirkland Lake, on May 20, 2008, and on September 29, 2008.

 

November 2008
Enforcement Blitz at Fish and Wildlife Check Leads to Charges

 

Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers from Chapleau District, and a canine unit from Sault Ste. Marie District, teamed up with the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) to conduct a late night fish and wildlife check from October 17 and 18, 2008, at the junction of Highway 129 and Highway 101, south of Chapleau.
 
Officers ensured compliance with respect to both provincial and federal legislations focusing on Ontario’s Hunting Regulations, including proper tagging and transportation of big game animals, possession limits of grouse and proper storage of firearms during prohibited hours.
 
Officers stopped and inspected 69 vehicles and contacted 150 residents and one non-resident.  Officers laid three charges under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act for:

 

  • failing to properly attach seal to moose
  • transporting wildlife unlawfully killed, captured or possessed
  • unlawfully possessing firearm at night.
     

Officers also issued 14 warnings under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act and Ontario Fishery Regulations for various offences including:

 

  • failing to affix validation tag to licence
  • hunting with a shotgun not permantly plugged
  • failing to provide information on seal
  • failing to comply with conditions of the license
  • skinning fish so that species cannot be readily identified.
     

In addition, the OPP laid one charge for speeding.

July 2008
MOST ANGLERS OBEYED THE RULES
Check of 3,100 Anglers Leads to 140 Charges

A four-week enforcement blitz by Ministry of Natural Resources in the northeast region found most anglers obeying the rules.  Special emphasis was placed on sensitive walleye fisheries throughout the northeast.

 

The blitz began on May 17, which corresponded to the opening weekend of walleye fishing in the northeast region, and ended on June 14.  The blitz covered an area from the Hudson Bay and James Bay coasts in the north, to the French and Mattawa rivers in the south, and from the Ontario-Quebec border in the east to Lake Superior and Manitouwadge in the west.

 

Conservation officers checked over 3,100 anglers and laid 140 charges including:

69 for fishing related offences including fishing without a licence
catching and retaining more fish than permitted by quota, and
transporting fish in a manner that they could not be identified or counted.
 

In total, 168 fish were seized including 130 walleye, 36 white bass, northern pike and yellow perch.

 

August 2008
MARINE FISHERIES PATROL RESULTS IN 22 CHARGES

Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers from Chapleau, Espanola and Gogama conducted a joint marine fisheries patrol with Ontario Provincial Police and Ontario Parks on Biscotasi Lake, Ramsey Lake, Indian Lake and Opeepeesway Lake from June 27 to 30, 2008.

 

Officers checked 189 anglers for compliance with both provincial and federal fish and game regulations.

 

Officers found 35 fisheries-related violations and laid three charges. The remaining violations were dealt with by warnings and by educating anglers about:

 

  • Keeping fish in a manner that allows their length to be measured
  • How to properly package fish fillets, ensuring a piece of skin is left on each fish fillet
  • Failing to produce a fishing licence for inspection and,
  •  Not making a false statement to a conservation officer.

Officers also found 35 violations for non-fisheries related legislations, and laid 19 charges and issued 16 warnings. The violations were related to:

 

  • Failure to possess personal flotation devices or lifejackets
  • Failure to possess proper boat safety equipment
  • Possession of alcohol while boating and,
  • Occupying Crown land for more than 21 days.

 

October 2008
Charges Laid During Opening Weekend of Moose Hunting Season

Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers laid 40 charges against hunters and anglers during the first three days of the moose-hunting season in the Thunder Bay area.
 
From October 11 to 13, six conservation officers, including the canine unit and two deputies, checked 314 hunters in Wildlife Management Unit 15B, in the Highway 811 area about 150 kilometres northwest of Thunder Bay.  In addition to the charges, the officers also issued 30 warnings and seized a variety of items including firearms.  They arrested a man for possession of a variety of narcotics and turned him over to the Ontario Provincial Police.
 
Some of the charges and warnings were as follows:

 

  • 12 charges and 10 warnings for failing to wear a proper helmet for an off-road vehicle
  • Nine warnings for failing to attach a validation tag to a game seal prior to the hunt
  • Eight charges of illegally having a loaded firearm in a vehicle
  • Five charges and one warning relating to hunting without possessing all necessary components of a licence
  • Three charges and one warning for having an unencased firearm after dark
  • Three charges of possessing an over limit of fish
  • Two charges of discharging a firearm from a roadway
  • Two charges of having alcohol in a vehicle
  • Two charges of abandoning bear meat suitable for food
  • One charge of failing to stop for a Conservation Officer
  • One charge of non-resident camping on Crown land without a permit
  • One charge of possessing another person’s seal while hunting.
     

Officers also seized a white-tailed deer head that had been illegally imported into Ontario from Manitoba.  Due to concerns about introducing Chronic Wasting Disease into the province, it is against the law to import deer or elk into Ontario unless special precautions are taken.

October 2008
GRAFTON AREA FISH POACHERS NET $1200 IN FINES

Two anglers received hefty fines for illegally netting rainbow trout in Shelter Valley Creek on the opening day of the April 2008 trout season.


A man from Trenton, and a man from Carrying Place, were fined $600 each for illegally netting four rainbow trout. A third man involved awaits a further court appearance.


The court heard that the men were arrested on April 25, 2008 under the Highway 401 causeway on Shelter Valley Creek by Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers. The officers saw the men using large landing nets to scoop fish out of the shallow waters after chasing them up against the culvert.


The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Port Hope, September 22, 2008.

 

October 2008
FINED $1,600 FOR ILLEGAL BUILDING AND DREDGING

A Thunder Bay man has been fined $1,600 for illegally building a house on Crown land and removing boulders from a lake.

 

The man was fined $1,000 for constructing a building on public lands and $600 for illegally dredging shore lands, contrary to the Public Lands Act.  The man plead guilty to both charges.

 

After receiving a tip from the MNR TIPS line, a Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officer from the Thunder Bay District office went to Burke Lake, also known as One Island Lake.

 

The officer discovered an excavator parked at the end of a lane off Gilbride Road in Fowler Township, tracks of the excavator that ran to the edge of the lake, and boulders from the lake and a newly constructed large, two-storey brick house on the shore. Further investigation revealed that the land was owned by the Ontario government. 

 

The officer interviewed the man, who admitted to building a house on the property and having a company dredge boulders from the shoreline.  The man also said he was unaware that the property was owned by the Crown.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Thunder Bay, on October 1, 2008.

 

 

October 2008
SELLING ANGLER-CAUGHT RAINBOW TROUT NETS FINE

A Watford resident has been fined $500 for selling fish illegally.

 

The man plead guilty to selling angler-caught fish without a licence.

 

On July 7, 2008, the man sold four rainbow trout caught in the Ontario waters of Lake Erie at Erieau in the Municipality of Chatham-Kent.  The man received forty dollars for the four rainbow trout.  Fish of any species, including rainbow trout, caught by an angler cannot be bought or sold in Ontario.

 

There are charges pending before the court for the person who bought the fish.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Chatham, on October 22, 2008.

 


October 2008
MEN FINED $3,000 FOR ILLEGAL DREDGING AND FILLING

A Toronto man has been fined for illegally dredging a stream and an Uxbridge man has been fined for illegally filling a lakeshore.

 

One of the men was fined $2,000 for illegally channeling a stream without the approval of the Ministry of Natural Resources.

 

The court was told that on July 30, 2008, a conservation officer from the Minden area visited a property in the City of Kawartha Lakes. The officer observed that about 176 metres of a stream had been dredged to a width of about two metres. All vegetation and earth down to the limestone base had been removed.

 

In a second case, a man was fined $1,000 for filling the shore lands of Lake Dalrymple in the City of Kawartha Lakes without a permit.

 

The cases were heard in Ontario Court of Justice in Lindsay on October 10, 2008.

 

 

October 2008
COLBORNE CREEK FISH POACHERS NET $2,000 IN FINES

Three men fishing together in the Colborne area this spring were fined $2,000 for fishing offences.


The man from Colborne, has been fined $1,200 for illegally netting four rainbow trout and is prohibited from fishing for two years.  He is also prohibited from possessing fishing equipment other than at his home. The court heard that the man had been convicted of angling infractions in the past, including netting trout illegally.


The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Brighton, on October 9, 2008.


Two other men involved in the same incident were fined $400 each earlier this year for possessing an over limit of rainbow trout.  One man from Scarborough, and another man from Keswick, were stopped by two Peterborough District conservation officers, who found them in excess of their quota of rainbow trout. They had been fishing with the man from Colborne that weekend.


The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Brighton, on July 10, 2008.

 

 

October 2008
ENFORCEMENT CHECK LEADS TO FISHING CHARGES
Twelve charges were laid against anglers stopped by Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers at a game and fish check station east of Fort Frances.

 

On September 26, 2008, conservation officers from Fort Frances, Atikokan and Dryden districts checked 155 non-residents and 14 residents vehicles who had been hunting or fishing, or possessed game or fish.  In addition to the charges, the officers issued nine warnings.

 

The ministry’s Dryden canine unit conducted eight vehicle inspections and assisted in the discovery of a large over limit of fish.

 

The violations included over limits of fish, transporting fish packaged so they could not be identified or counted, and failure to produce a licence.  Conservation officers are also continuing to investigate a number of other violations.

 

October 2008
CHARGES LAID DURING OPENING WEEKEND OF MOOSE HUNTING SEASON

Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers laid 40 charges against hunters and anglers during the first three days of the moose-hunting season in the Thunder Bay area.
 
From October 11 to 13, six conservation officers, including the canine unit and two deputies, checked 314 hunters in Wildlife Management Unit 15B, in the Highway 811 area about 150 kilometres northwest of Thunder Bay.  In addition to the charges, the officers also issued 30 warnings and seized a variety of items including firearms.  They arrested a man for possession of a variety of narcotics and turned him over to the Ontario Provincial Police.
 
Some of the charges and warnings were as follows:

  • 12 charges and 10 warnings for failing to wear a proper helmet for an off-road vehicle
  • Nine warnings for failing to attach a validation tag to a game seal prior to the hunt
  • Eight charges of illegally having a loaded firearm in a vehicle
  • Five charges and one warning relating to hunting without possessing all necessary components of a licence  
  • Three charges and one warning for having an unencased firearm after dark
  • Three charges of possessing an over limit of fish
  • Two charges of discharging a firearm from a roadway
  • Two charges of having alcohol in a vehicle
  • Two charges of abandoning bear meat suitable for food
  • One charge of failing to stop for a Conservation Officer
  • One charge of non-resident camping on Crown land without a permit
  • One charge of possessing another person’s seal while hunting.

 

Officers also seized a white-tailed deer head that had been illegally imported into Ontario from Manitoba.  Due to concerns about introducing Chronic Wasting Disease into the province, it is against the law to import deer or elk into Ontario unless special precautions are taken.

 

 

October 2008
MAN FINED FOR ILLEGALLY KEEPING BIRDS IN CAPTIVITY

A Tottenham man has been fined for keeping specially protected birds in captivity without a licence, contrary to the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act.

 

The man and The Falconry Center Inc. were fined a total of $6000. 

 

The court heard that conservation officers conducted a lengthy investigation into irregularities at The Falconry Centre, a business owned by the man. The officers uncovered evidence that the company had failed to comply with provincial licensing regulations related to keeping specially protected birds in captivity. 

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice in Barrie on October 20, 2008.

 

October 2008
SNAGGED DUCK PROVES COSTLY

A Toronto man has been convicted of snagging a duck with a fishing rod.

 

The man was fined $ 500 for illegally catching a duck contrary to the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act and Migratory Birds Convention Act and Regulations.

 

The court heard that in the early morning of September 25, 2008, a conservation officer checked a man who was fishing from shore at the City of Barrie waterfront.  When inspecting the catch, the officer found a garbage bag that was moving.  A mallard duck then poked its head out of a hole in the bottom of the bag.  It was determined that the man snagged the duck with a large treble hook and sinker and kept it alive.

 

The officer was able to successfully release the duck.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice in Barrie on October 20, 2008.

 

October 2008
ENFORCEMENT CHECKS LEAD TO MOOSE HUNTING CHARGES

Twenty-two charges were laid against moose hunters in the Armstrong area after Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers checked hunters during the first five days of the early gun moose-hunting season.

 

Two Thunder Bay District conservation officers checked 86 hunters from September 20 to 24. In addition to the charges, the officers issued 10 warnings and seized two high-powered rifles in Wildlife Management Unit 16C.  The ministry's canine unit helped officers investigate an incident in which a moose was shot in the middle of Trail Lake Road and then abandoned.
 
Officers laid charges and issued warnings as follows:

  • 12 charges of trespassing for the purpose of hunting
  • Four charges of illegally having a loaded firearm in a vehicle
  • Two charges of hunting without carrying a licence
  • Two charges and one warning for failing to wear a proper helmet for an off-road vehicle
  • One charge of unlawfully hunting at night
  • One charge of disobeying a sign
  • Six warnings for failing to affix a validation tag
  • Two warnings for illegally possessing a firearm at night
  • One warning for failing to properly attach a seal to a moose.

 

Some trespassing charges related to hunters traveling behind signs that said roads were closed.  Hunters are reminded to carefully read any signs they find along forest roads, particularly in the Armstrong area, where access to some roads is restricted because of the presence of remote tourism facilities, or in order to manage caribou.

 

 

October 2008
$3,000 FINE FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING VIOLATION

A commercial fishing boat captain and a commercial fishing company have each been fined $1,500 for not reporting accurately a catch of whitefish from Lake Erie.

 

The captain of the commercial fishing boat and the owner of the commercial fishing licence, were found guilty of violating the conditions of their commercial fishing licence.

 

An investigation by a Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officer found that the captain had not declared 321 kilograms (707 pounds) of whitefish he caught on November 28, 2007, and landed at Kingsville.

 

The federal charges were heard during a trial in Ontario Court of Justice, Windsor, on April 9, 2008.  The penalty was set on October 1, 2008.

 

 

October 2008 
HUNTERS FINED FOR DISOBEYING ROAD CLOSURE SIGNS

Three local Dubreuilville residents pleaded guilty to trespass offences and were fined $200 each for trespassing for the purpose of hunting.

 

Court heard that on October 13, 2007, Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers were conducting surveillance on Road 14 in Doucett Township north of Dubreuilville. The road was posted as closed to vehicular traffic for the period of October 6–19, 2007. 

 

The accused were seen driving past the access restriction sign and were stopped by conservation officers.  All of the accused were hunting at the time and all firearms were seized.  The firearms will be returned upon payment of the fines imposed by the court.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Wawa, on September 16, 2008.

 

 

October 2008
PRE-SEASON WALLEYE PROVE COSTLY FOR LOCAL ANGLER

A man from Englehart has been fined $1,050, had his fishing licence suspended for one year and lost his fishing equipment after illegally fishing for walleye during the closed season.

 

The man plead guilty to catching and keeping six walleye out of season and to angling with three fishing rods. The man’s fishing equipment was forfeited to the Crown.

 

The court was told that on May 5, 2008, the man caught two walleye and hid them along the bank of the Blanche River to avoid detection. Conservation officers checking for illegal fishing in the area found the two hidden fish, along with four other walleye. The officers also saw the man tending three set and baited fishing rods, which they seized.  

 

The Blanche River is in Fisheries Management Zone 8, where the angling season for walleye is closed each year from April 15 to the third Saturday in May. The closed season protects walleye during their spawning period. Every fish removed during spawning is a major loss to the walleye population in the area.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Temiskaming Shores, September 4, 2008.

 

 

September 2008
BAIT FISHERMAN FINED $1,000 FOR LICENCE VIOLATIONS
Two Meaford area commercial bait fishermen were given a $1,000 fine and a suspended sentence for moving bait fish that may have been infected with the fish disease viral hemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS).

 

One man was fined and the second, received a suspended sentence after they both pleaded guilty to violating conditions of their commercial bait licence.

 

The court heard that in October 2007 the men caught more than 1,000 litres of spottail shiners in the Bighead River, where viral hemorrhagic septicaemia has been detected. They transported the fish to the Municipality of West Grey, where the disease has not been detected.

 

Viral hemorrhagic septicaemia, which affects a number of species including spottail shiners, may be spread by moving fish, water, vessels or equipment that has had contact with the virus.  To slow the spread of this disease in Ontario, the Ministry of Natural Resources established a management zone containing Ontario's virus-positive waters. Moving live bait fish from this zone to a disease-free zone creates a serious risk that the virus will spread.  Such transfers are therefore prohibited.

 

The case was heard in Provincial Offences Court, Walkerton, on September 9, 2008.

 

September 2008
AGGREGATE PIT COMPANY FINED $15,500

An aggregate pit company in Leamington has been convicted of an offence under the Aggregate Resources Act.

 

A representative of the sand and gravel company plead guilty to violating conditions of their aggregate pit licence. The company was fined $15,500.

 

The court was told that a Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officer and an aggregate resources technical specialist investigated the company after it reported extracting more than its’ annually allowed tonnage.  The pit was licensed to remove 50,000 tonnes of material per calendar year, but in 2006 more than 131,000 tonnes were removed.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Windsor, on September 23, 2008.

 

Restrictions on aggregate extraction help control and minimize impacts of pit operations on neighbouring residents and govern truck volumes on municipal roads.

 


September 2008
MEN FINED $2,250 FOR LEAVING GARBAGE ON CROWN LAND

Two men have been fined a total of $2,250 in three separate cases for leaving garbage on Crown land.

 

A local tourist outfitter in the Red Lake area, has been fined $1,750 in one incident and $250 in another, for offences under the Public Lands Act.

 

In the first incident, the outfitter had illegally built a structure on Crown land in 2005 at a remote lake locally known as Surprise Lake.  He had also left camping gear and other items at the site.  After a lengthy investigation, Ministry of Natural Resources Red Lake District conservation officers determined that the outfitter was responsible.

 

In another incident, the outfitter left a tent bottom structure and other items at a Restricted Land Use Permit site that he had used for conducting a moose hunt during the fall of 2006.

 

A man from Wallaceburg, Ontario, was fined $250 after being convicted of leaving garbage and various items from his moose hunt camp after the 2007 fall hunt.

 

All three sites were cleaned up by the defendants prior to the court date.

 

The cases were heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Red Lake, on September 10, 2008.

 

 

September 2008
COTTAGE OWNER CONVICTED FOR FILLING SHORELANDS

A Burlington man has been fined $1,000 for filling shore lands without a work permit.

 

The man plead guilty in court to the offence and was also ordered to remove the fill material.

 

Court heard that the man had illegally deposited three truckloads of fill along the shore of Cranberry Lake, west of Eagle Lake.   A work permit was not issued, as required by the Ministry of Natural Resources. 


The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Minden, on September 4, 2008

 

 

September 2008
MARINE PATROLS PROTECTING LAKE NIPIGON FISHERY
Anglers Fined $4,600

Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers have been conducting patrols on Lake Nipigon during the summer in an effort to protect this world class brook trout, lake trout and northern pike fishery from over fishing.

 

Fourteen anglers have been fined a total of $4,600 after Nipigon District conservation officers conducted two overnight marine patrols on Lake Nipigon in late June and early July of this year.

 

A resident from Thunder Bay, plead guilty and was fined $750 for giving false information to an officer, $400 for possessing a brook trout less than 56 cm in length and $200 for transporting the undersized brook trout while operating a charter boat on Lake Nipigon.

 

Six anglers from Wisconsin, five anglers from Ontario and two anglers from Illinois were each fined $250 for angling with a barbed hook. 

 

The hooks and fish were seized and forfeited to the Crown.  The fish were donated to charity.

 

The cases were heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Nipigon, July 28 and September 22, 2008.

 

Anglers are reminded that Lake Nipigon is a world class brook trout, lake trout and northern pike fishery.  Special size and limit restrictions required anglers to release many fish in order to comply with the regulations, which have been in place since 1997.The use of barbless hooks allows fish to be released easily and quickly.  The less a fish is handled and the less it is damaged by hooks, the more likely it is to survive.

 

 

September 2008
ILLEGAL BEAR HUNTS RESULT IN $3,250 IN FINES AND PROBATION

A tourist outfitter from Gowganda has been has been fined $3,250 and placed on probation for illegal bear hunts.

 

The owner of a hunting camp in northern Ontario, was convicted of possessing illegally killed wildlife and contravening conditions of his Licence to Provide Bear Hunting Services.  The owner was fined $3,250 and is under probation for two years.  A bear mount has been permanently forfeited to the Crown and the owner’s firearm will be returned when his fines have been paid.

 

The conviction followed a two-year investigation into illegal bear hunts by Ontario and U.S. wildlife officials.

 

Court was told that in July 2007, a black bear was illegally killed on the property of the camp by a non-resident and was later possessed illegally by the outfitter.  In August 2007, the outfitter contravened the conditions of his Licence to Provide Bear Hunting Services by permitting a non-resident person to illegally provide these services for clients of the camp.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Temiskaming Shores, September 4, 2008.

 

 

September 2008
HEFTY FINES FOR FAILING TO STOP AND FOR OVERLIMIT OF WALLEYE

A Fauquier man has been fined $1,000 for failing to stop for a conservation officer. A second charge of possessing an overlimit of walleye resulted in a fine of $1,950.

 

The man plead guilty to these offences under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act and the Ontario Fishery Regulations.

 

On June 7, 2008, conservation officers, on fishery patrol, observed the man operating an all-terrain vehicle in Shackleton Township east of Kapuskasing. Officers signaled him to stop for an inspection.  He failed to do so and was later located and found to be in possession of 13 walleye with no valid Ontario angling licence.

 

The case was heard in Provincial Offences Court, Kapuskasing,  September 10, 2008.

 

 

September 2008
TWO MEN FINED $2,500 FOR ILLEGAL MOOSE

Two Dryden men have been fined $2,500 after pleading guilty to illegal moose hunting.

 

The first man was fined $1,500 for hunting a bull moose without a licence and $500 for illegally possessing a bull moose.  He is also banned from hunting for one year. 

 

The second man was fined $500 for illegally attaching a moose tag and validation seal to an animal when he was not a member of a hunting party.

 

On October 7, 2007, the first man shot and killed a bull moose and a cow moose, although he was only licensed to hunt for a cow or calf moose.  He then had the second man help him drag the animals out of the bush.  When the man discovered that the second man had a bull moose tag, he pressured him to attach it to the moose to legitimize the kill.  The second man did so reluctantly.

 

However, at the time the man shot the moose, the men had not agreed to be members of a hunting party, and the man was unaware that the second man had a bull moose validation tag.  After an investigation, conservation officers from the Dryden district office of the Ministry of Natural Resources laid charges against the two men.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Dryden, on September 16, 2008.

 

 

September 2008
COUPLE FINED $2,500 FOR TOO MANY FISH
$100 For Each Walleye Over The Limit

An Ignace couple have been fined $2,500 for possessing 25 walleye over the legal limit.

 

The couple who plead not guilty, were convicted following a trial. The fish were donated to charity.

 

Ministry of Natural Resources Dryden District conservation officers searched the residence in Ignace on October 6, 2005.  They found five bags of frozen walleye fillets.  After thawing the fish, the officers counted 33 walleye.  The legal limit for the two anglers was four walleye each.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Ignace, September 11, 2008.

 

 

September 2008
FINED $750 FOR BUYING FISH ILLEGALLY

A Thunder Bay man has been fined $750 for buying fish illegally.

 

The man plead guilty to the offence under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act.

 

On April 25, 2007, Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers checked the man while patrolling the Current River in the City of Thunder Bay.  The officers inspected his truck and found a cooler with 18 kilograms of frozen walleye fillets.  The man told the officers he had bought the fillets that morning for $200 cash and had no paperwork to verify the transaction.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Thunder Bay, September 3, 2008.

 

The ministry reminds the public that fish can only be purchased from a licensed commercial fishing licence holder, an aquaculture facility, a commercial bait dealer or someone who subsequently sells fish originally purchased from one of these licensed sellers.  Detailed receipts must be provided documenting all sales to ensure the fish were not caught illegally.


 

August 2008
ANGLERS HOOKED FOR $1,800 ON LAKE NIPIGON

Eight anglers have been fined a total of $1,800 after pleading guilty to angling with barbed hooks and extra hooks on Lake Nipigon.

 

The following anglers were convicted of angling with more than one barbless hook:

  • Two men from Minnesota, were each fined $250
  • Two men from Cadillac, Michigan, were each fined $200

 

The following anglers were convicted of angling with a barbed hook:

  • One man from Minnesota, was fined $250
  • One man from Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, was fined $250
  • Two men from Ontario, were each fined $200

 

The men were charged after Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers conducted an enforcement blitz on Lake Nipigon from June 19 to 21, 2008.

 

The cases were heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Nipigon, August 25, 2008.

 

Anglers are reminded that Lake Nipigon is a world class trout and pike fishery.  Special size and limit restrictions require anglers to release many fish in order to comply with the regulations, which have been in place since 1997.  The use of barbless hooks allows fish to be released easily and quickly.  The less a fish is handled and the less it is damaged by hooks, the more likely it is to survive and be available for future harvest.

 

 

August 2008
$2500 FINE FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING VIOLATION


A commercial fishing boat captain has been fined $2500 for not reporting fish caught over his quota and discarding the dead fish in Lake Erie rather than turning them over to a conservation officer.

 

The man from Wheatley, captain of the commercial fishing boat, plead guilty to violating the conditions of his commercial fishing licence.

 

Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers received information alleging that the captain had dumped about 70 kilograms of dead yellow perch from his boat into Lake Erie off the shores of Chatham-Kent.  Conservation officers investigated the alleged incident and determined that the man was trawling for smelt and had previously caught his quota of yellow perch. He did not report the discarded yellow perch on the daily catch report and did not give the fish to a conservation officer as required.

 

The federal charges were heard in Ontario Court of Justice in Windsor, August 20, 2008.

 

 

August 2008
TWO HUNTERS FINED $2,500 FOR ILLEGAL DEER HUNT

Two Wiarton-area residents who were convicted of deer hunting violations have been fined a total of $2,500.


The first man was convicted of illegally transporting three white-tailed deer and two counts of hunting white-tailed deer without a licence.  He was fined $600 for each offence.

 
The second man was fined a total of $700 for failing to immediately attach his seal to a deer while party hunting with the first man and illegally transporting three white-tailed deer. 

 
Both men will have their hunting licences suspended if their fines are not paid before the start of the 2008 deer hunting season.


The court heard that on the evening of November 9, 2007, Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers stopped a vehicle carrying the two men in Albemarle Township.  Three untagged antlerless deer, which the first man had shot, were in the back of the truck.  The two hunters said they were taking the deer back to their hunt camp to tag them with tags that others in their party were presumed to have.  The two hunters were not party hunting with the other members of the camp and did not know whether the other tags had been filled.  The second man had a valid antlerless tag in his possession but had not placed it on any of the deer they were carrying.


The case was heard in the Provincial Offences Court, Owen Sound, August 6, 2008.

 

 

August 2008
BIG FINE OF $1,000 FOR FAILING TO REMOVE ICE FISHING HUT

The owner of an ice fishing hut was fined $1,000 for failing to remove it from the lake by the deadline.


A man from Minden, was fined for leaving an ice fishing hut on Mountain Lake in Fisheries Management Zone 15, after March 31 – the date by which huts must be removed from the lakes.


Court heard that on April 8, 2008, conservation officers from Bancroft District received a complaint concerning an ice hut remaining on Mountain Lake.  Officers spoke with the man on two different days about removing the ice hut.  Finally on April 14, with the ice quickly melting and the threat of warm weather and rain, Minden Area conservation officers were able to remove the hut, with difficulty, from the lake.

   
The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Minden, on August 7, 2008.

 

 

July 2008
FINED $7,500 FOR CARELESS HUNTING
Ministry Solves Case with Help from Public

Four Vermont men have been fined $7,500 after being convicted of a variety of deer hunting violations which took place north of Kenora.

 

A man from Worcester and a man from Barre, have been fined $1,500 and $1,000, respectively, for careless hunting and will be required to successfully complete a hunter’s education course before being allowed to hunt in Ontario again.  They were also fined $500 for allowing flesh of a game animal to become unsuitable for human consumption.

 

All four men were also fined $1,000 each for night hunting.  The entire party has been banned from hunting in Ontario for one year and one man received an additional one year ban as the shooter.  Their four rifles that were seized will be returned when the fines are paid.

 

On October 24, 2007, the four men were driving on the Anderson Road, which is a rural residential area, when they spotted a buck on the west side of the road.  One of the men from Worcester got out of the truck, shot and killed the buck despite the fact that it was after the end of legal hunting time.  The men left the buck and returned the next day to retrieve it.  After attempting to drag it to the truck, they abandoned it a second time. 

 

Kenora District conservation officers were contacted and the trophy-sized buck was seized and later disposed of because the meat was no longer suitable for donation to charity.  Assistance from local residents aided the conservation officers in tracking down the parties involved.

 


July 2008
COURT ORDERS LOCAL MAN TO PAY FOR PART OF THE SUPPRESSION COSTS AFTER STARTING A FOREST FIRE
A Wavell man was fined $750 and ordered to pay $10,000 restitution for part of the costs for fighting a fire that burned in Benoit Township in May 2007.

 

The man was found guilty of failing to keep a fire under control.

 

Court heard that on May 7, 2007, the man was burning grass on his neighbour’s property in Benoit Township.  Due to dry conditions and high winds, the fire reached a size of over 14 hectares before Ministry of Natural Resources fire crews could extinguish it.  The suppression effort involved four MNR fire crews, two water bombers and helicopter support.

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Timmins on June 20, 2008.

 

If you see a forest fire, immediately contact the East Region fire reporting hotline at
1-888-863-3473.

 

 

July 2008
COMMERCIAL FISHING OFFENCES LEAD TO $8,000 IN FINES AND A TEN-YEAR BAN

Two Thunder Bay men have been fined $8,000 for commercial fishing offences, with one man receiving a ten-year ban from participating in the commercial fishing industry.

 
One man plead guilty to two over-quota charges and was fined $4,000.


A second man was convicted in court of two over-quota charges and was fined $4,000.  He also received a ban from any involvement in the commercial fishing industry for the next 10 years.  The commercial fishing ban was imposed as a result of a range of convictions over more than 25 years.


Commercial fishing licence holders are responsible for taking the appropriate steps to ensure that they do not exceed their quota. The over quota fish seized by the ministry were sold for more than $3,800 which was redirected to the Special Purpose Account for funding fish and wildlife work across the province.


The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Thunder Bay, on November 29-30, 2006, and March 10-12, 2007.  On June 24, 2008, the court rejected the abuse of process application and convicted the second man on both counts.

 


July 2008
CUTTING TREES IN A PROVINCIAL PARK PROVES COSTLY

A Tillsonburg man was fined for illegally cutting trees and brush within a provincial park.

 

The man was fined $1000.00 for cutting trees and brush in Port Burwell Provincial Park.  He was also issued a court order to provide the park with an additional $2000.00 for the purchase of trees to replace those that had been cut.

 

Court heard that during the months of February and March of 2008, the man had friends cut trees and brush on a hillside within Port Burwell Provincial Park.  His cottage is located at the top of the hill adjacent to the park. The clearing of trees and brush provided a better view of Lake Erie. The removal of the trees may cause future erosion problems in the park. 

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, St. Thomas, on July 25, 2008.

 

 

July 2008
CHECK OF NIAGARA AND HALDIMAND FISHING AREAS FINDS MOST ANGLERS OBEYING THE RULES

Most of the anglers checked during a recent enforcement blitz of local fishing hot spots in the Niagara Region and Haldimand County were obeying Ontario's fishing regulations.

 

Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers conducted a plain-clothes enforcement operation over two weekends between Friday, July 11, and Sunday, July 20, 2008. 

 

A team of conservation officers from the Guelph, Aylmer, Aurora, Lake Erie and Lake Ontario offices of the ministry converged on many of the popular fishing areas in the Niagara Region and Haldimand County.  Officers were working with information received in 2007 from the TIPS toll-free line and information gathered locally.

 

The conservation officers contacted 430 people during the blitz.  A total of 57 charges and 21 warnings were issued for offences related to fishing, including:

  • exceeding the daily catch limit for bass (daily limit is six and daily conservation limit is two)
  • possession and use of gobies as bait
  • fishing without a licence
  • fishing with more than one line
  • failure to produce a fishing licence
  • trespassing on property for the purpose of fishing
  • possession of open liquor.

 

The set fines imposed for these offences totalled $9,985.00.

 

For more information on fishing regulations, please consult the 2008-2009 Recreational Fishing Regulations Summary available from licence issuers, ServiceOntario/Government Information Centres, and on the ministry's website at ontario.ca/fishing.

 

 

July 2008
$9,000 IN FINES FOR FISHERMEN CAUGHT BY THEIR OWN NET

Three Greater Toronto Area men have been fined a total of $9,000 for fishing in the Talbot River fish sanctuary during the walleye spawning run.

 

The three men from Markham, Toronto, and Scarborough, plead guilty to fishing in a fish sanctuary during a closed time.  Each man was fined $3,000 and received a suspended sentence for fishing by a method other than angling without an appropriate licence.

 

On the night of April 18, 2008, at the height of the Talbot River’s walleye spawning run, Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers saw a man casting a net several times into the river while two other men acted as lookouts.  The officers arrested the men and seized their net.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Whitby, on June 23, 2008.

 

 

July 2008
WOODBRIDGE MAN FINED $8,000 FOR ILLEGAL MOOSE HUNTING

After an 18-month investigation, a Woodbridge man has been fined $8,000 and suspended from hunting in Ontario for illegal moose hunting.


The man was fined $4,000 for illegally killing a moose and another $4,000 for abandoning it.  He was also suspended from hunting for five years and forfeited his firearm to the Crown.


Court heard that on January 4, 2007, conservation officers from the Minden area, acting on a complaint from the public, attended a site near Sebright in the City of Kawartha Lakes and found an abandoned moose kill site.  Search warrants and forensic analysis revealed that the man and another party were hunting together on the morning of December 28, 2006, and shot and killed a moose during the closed season.  A plan to retrieve the moose from the bush was thwarted after the two saw another person in the area.  The moose was abandoned and left to spoil.


Charges against the second individual are still before the courts.


The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Lindsay, June 24, 2008.

 


July 2008
SEARCH OF ANGLERS RESIDENCE RESULTS IN OVERLIMIT CHARGES

A Dryden man has been fined to pay $3,150 in fines for an over limit of lake trout found in his home.

 

The man plead guilty to possessing an over limit of lake trout, resulting in a $3,000 fine.  He also plead guilty to using an extra line while ice fishing and was fined $150. 

 

On March 8, 2008, conservation officers saw the man fishing on Upper Manitou Lake. When conservation officers and the Ontario Provincial Police executed a search warrant of his residence, they found 21 lake trout –13 over the legal limit that occupants of the house were allowed to possess.  All lake trout were seized and forfeited to the Crown.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Dryden, June 17, 2008.

 

June 2008
ANGLERS CHECKED ON LAKE NIPIGON
Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers from Nipigon District conducted a
three-day fisheries check by boat on Lake Nipigon from June 19 to 21, 2008.

 

Officers checked 76 anglers - 36 non-resident and 40 resident - for compliance with both provincial and federal fish and game regulations. Officers paid special attention to Lake Nipigon’s special fishing regulations, including the use of a single barb-less hook per line, prohibited use of stringers and live wells for trout; and possession of fish of prohibited length.

 

Twenty-seven fisheries-related violations were detected and 19 charges laid. The remaining violations were dealt with by warnings and by educating anglers about special angling restrictions on the lake, including:

  • angling with barbed hooks;
  • angling with more than one hook;
  • possessing undersized brook trout; and,
  • obstructing a conservation officer.

 

In addition, 13 violations were detected for non-fisheries related legislations, for which officers laid two charges and issued 11 warnings. The violations were related to: 

  • unregistered commercial vessel (charter boat);
  • unregistered personal watercraft;
  • failure to possess proper boat safety equipment; and,
  • possession of alcohol while boating.

 

June 2008
MUST PAY $5,200 FOR CAUSING FIRE

A man has been ordered to pay $5,200 to the Ministry of Natural Resources, the cost of putting out a fire that he started. 

 

The man from Kingsford Township, north of Emo, was also fined $150 after he plead guilty to burning grass without a permit.

 

On April 18, 2008, the man started a fire to burn the grass around his house in Kingsford Township.  The fire was spotted by a Ministry of Natural Resources helicopter fire detection flight. 

 

A fire crew was dispatched and fought the fire with water packs, hand tools and fire hose.   It was finally necessary to have a water bomber drop a number of loads of water before a second fire crew was called to help.  After about two hours, the fire, which had burned just over 11 hectares of land, was finally extinguished.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Fort Frances, June 13, 2008.

 

JUNE 2008
LOCAL MAN FINED FOR PUBLIC LANDS ACT OFFENCES

 
A Wawa resident has been fined $5,500 for various land offences and illegal forest operations.

 

The man plead guilty to offences committed under the Public Lands Act and Crown Forest Sustainability Act.

 

The court heard that between October of 2005 and October 2006, a trail was constructed on Crown Land adjacent to the man’s property on Kabenung Lake. A conservation officer and lands specialist from Wawa District office investigated and uncovered numerous offences under the Public Lands Act relating to depositing material on Crown land and filling shorelands.  The man was also fined for conducting forest operations in a Crown forest not in accordance with the Forest Management Plan.

 

In addition to the fines, the man was also ordered to plant trees, remove garbage and shoreline fill, and to return the area to its natural state.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Wawa, June 17, 2008.

 


June 2008
MNR CONDUCTS 24-HOUR FISHERIES ENFORCEMENT CHECK

Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers from Dryden, Sioux Lookout, Red Lake, Kenora and Fort Frances Districts, including a canine unit, conducted a 24-hour fisheries check station on June 12 to13 on Highway 502, south of Dryden.

 

The Ministry of Transportation and the Ontario Provincial Police also attended the check station on June 13.

 

Officers checked for compliance with both provincial and federal fish and game regulations and paid special attention to Ontario’s fishing regulations, including over limits of fish, possession of fish of prohibited length and proper packaging and transportation of fish.

 

Conservation officers checked 1,173 non-resident anglers and 16 resident anglers; 64 fisheries-related violations were detected including:

  • Possessing over limit of walleye
  • Possessing northern pike of prohibited length
  • Transporting fish whose species cannot be readily counted or identified, and 
  • Failing to produce a licence.

 

Sixteen charges were laid.  The remaining violations were dealt with by warnings and educating anglers about proper fish measurement and transport techniques.

 

 

June 2008
BIG FINES AND HUNTING BANS FOR NIGHT HUNTERS

Three Ontario hunters, all residents of Stoney Creek, have been fined a total of $5,655 for night hunting.

 

A man plead guilty to hunting moose at night, having an illegally killed moose and making a false statement to a conservation officer. He was fined $4,500 and banned from hunting moose in Ontario for five years.

 

A second man plead guilty to hunting moose at night. He was fined $1,000 and banned from hunting moose in Ontario for two years.

 

A third man plead guilty to illegally having a firearm at night, and was fined $155. 

 

The moose was forfeited to the Crown.

 

Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers received complaints of a bull moose shot in the dark on the morning of October 7, 2006.  An investigation revealed that the first two men hunted moose on the opening day of the moose hunt before the legal hunt time.  Moose hunting is only allowed from a half hour before sunrise to a half hour after sunset. Outside the legal hunt time, firearms must be unloaded and encased.

 

The first man shot a bull moose in the dark and, with the second man’s help, attempted to conceal the fact that it was shot during prohibited hours.  When shooting the moose, the first man fired two shots from a high-powered rifle in the direction of three other hunters walking a trail about 400 yards away. This was the third adult moose shot illegally by the first man since 2003.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Chapleau, June 11, 2008.

 

 

 

June 2008
TWO DAY CHECK RESULTS IN 24 CHARGES

 

Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers laid 24 charges and issued 17 warnings during a two day check station, on Hwy 17, at Agawa Bay, 90 km south of Wawa.

 

Between 12:45 p.m. on Thursday June 5, 2008 and 3:30 p.m. on Friday June 6, 2008 conservation officers from Wawa district with the assistance of other officers from across the Northeast Region inspected a total of 135 vehicles and contacted 347 individuals.

 

The conservation officers laid charges for the following offences:
12 – Non-residents over 18 years of age camp on crown land without a permit;
 5 – Possessing more than specified quota of fish from specified waters;

 4 – Possessing fish packed so that the species or number cannot readily be identifiable;
 1 – Angling without a licence;
 1 – Making a false statement to a conservation officer;
 1 – Unlawfully sport fishing with a dip-net, seine or bait fish trap.

 

It was determined through further investigation that most individuals charged with over possession of fish also had eaten fish in their possession on the previous evening, resulting in larger over limit than detected at the check station. 

 


June 2008
HUNTERS FINED $3,500 FOR ILLEGAL MOOSE HUNTING

Killing a moose illegally and failing to tag a calf moose immediately after it was shot has cost three men $3,500.

 

The first man from Sault Ste. Marie, was fined $2,500 for unlawfully killing a cow moose, allowing a moose to spoil, making a false statement to a conservation officer and failing to tag a calf moose immediately after it was shot.  Two other men from Sault Ste. Marie, were also fined $500 each for transporting illegally possessed wildlife.

 

Court heard that the first man shot a cow and calf moose while hunting north of Sault Ste. Marie on October 12, 2007.  He did not have a licence/tag to hunt cow moose and reported the killing to the MNR TIPS line, but made no attempt to clean the animal which ultimately spoiled.  The man also lied to conservation officers about failing to seal the calf moose immediately after it was killed.  The two other men transported the untagged calf moose approximately 30 kilometres and did not tag it until five hours after it was killed.  The calf moose was seized.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Sault Ste. Marie, June 5, 2008.

  


June 2008
ILLEGAL BEAR HUNTING RESULTS IN FINES

An American man and an Ontarian man have plead guilty to bear hunting offences.

 

The man from Sturgis, Michigan, plead guilty to hunting bear without a licence and unlawfully using another person’s game seal and was fined $1,000.  The man from Searchmont, Ontario, plead guilty to enabling someone to use a licence and was fined $500.  Hostetler will get his firearm back once his fines are paid.  The man from Michigan was also banned from hunting for one year.

 

Court heard that on September 29, 2007, conservation officers checked the man from Michigan during a fish and game road check at the Sault Ste. Marie international border.  He had a high-powered rifle and admitted that he had been bear hunting at Achigan Lake, north of Sault Ste. Marie.  The man from Michigan did not have a non-resident bear licence but produced an Ontario resident bear seal.  The bear seal belonged to the man from Ontario, who left it at the camp where the American was staying.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Sault Ste. Marie, June 5, 2008.

  

 

June 2008
FORT FRANCES ROAD CHECK FINDS IMPROPER PACKAGING OF FISH

Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers found that almost 30 anglers had improperly packaged their fish during a road check just east of Fort Frances.

 

On May 26, 2008, conservation officers from Fort Frances and Dryden stopped 200 vehicles in a road check on Highway 11, about two kilometres east of Fort Frances.

 

The officers, assisted by the Northwest Region Canine Team, inspected 135 vehicles and spoke to 406 anglers.  They issued 11 charges and 17 warnings, all for improper packaging of fish.

 

The ministry reminds anglers that fish must be transported so that the species can be easily identified, counted and also measured if size limits apply.

 

 

June 2008
CANINE UNIT HELPS OUT AT RED LAKE ROAD CHECK

Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers laid nine charges and handed out 16 warnings during a road check on Highway 105, north of Vermilion Bay.
 
On May 24, 2008, conservation officers from Red Lake, Dryden and Kenora districts, assisted by the northwest region’s canine team and Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) officers from Red Lake and Dryden, checked 180 vehicles and 247 anglers.

 

The conservation officers laid seven charges for possessing over limits of walleye and pike, one charge for possessing a pike that was over the size limit and one charge for making a false statement to a conservation officer.  The conservation officer/canine handler’s partner “Riggs” detected two extra walleye that were hidden in a survival kit in one vehicle.  The officers also issued 16 warnings for improper packaging of fish and over limit offences.

 

The OPP laid three charges for seat belt violations and one charge for speeding.  They also issued nine warnings for seatbelt offences and six warnings for alcohol offences.

 

 

 

May 2008
ILLEGAL BULL MOOSE COSTS FIVE MEN $12,300
Three Dryden men and two Wisconsin men have been fined $12,300 after pleading guilty to a variety of offences in the illegal killing of a bull moose.

 

A man from Wisconsin, and a man from Dryden, were each fined $2,000 for illegally hunting a bull moose, $1,000 for illegal possession of a bull moose and $1,000 for illegally transporting a bull moose.

 

A second man from Dryden, was fined $1,000 for each of three offences: providing false information to a conservation officer, illegally possessing a moose and illegally transporting a moose.

 

All three men have been banned from hunting for one year.  The man from Wisconsin forfeited the mounted moose head to the Crown, and the two men from Dryden forfeited the moose meat.

 

A second man fromWisconsin, was fined $500 for illegal possession and $500 for illegal transportation of a moose.

 

A third man from Dryden, was fined $300 for providing false information to a conservation officer.

 

Conservation officers were aided in their investigation by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Dryden, on May 20, 2008.

 

 

May 2008
FINED $4,000 FOR 23 ILLEGAL WALLEYE
Two Illinois men have been fined $4,000 after pleading guilty to having 23 illegal walleye.

 

Two men from Rock Island, Illinois, were each fined $2,000 and forfeited the fish to the Crown.

 

On June 20, 2007, the two men were fishing in Osbourne Bay on Eagle Lake, south of Dryden.  Ministry of Natural Resources Dryden District conservation officers checked the men and discovered that they possessed 31 walleye, 23 more than their eight-day non-resident sport fishing licences allowed.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Dryden, on May 20, 2008.

 

 

May 2008
CONSERVATION OFFICERS CATCH ANGLERS SELLING FISH
Two LaSalle area residents were apprehended after a 13-month investigation into the illegal sale of angler-caught fish.

 

On May 15, Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers shut down two local fishers in LaSalle and Windsor who are alleged to have been taking over limits of walleye and illegally selling walleye and yellow perch locally.  Conservation officers also seized two vehicles, two fishing vessels, a commercial fish scaler, a processing table, fridge, freezer and the associated processing gear, along with fishing gear.

 

If you have any information about the illegal sale of fish in the LaSalle and Windsor areas, please contact the MNR TIPS line and the information will be forwarded to the appropriate office.

 

 

May 2008
$2,050 FINE FOR FISHING VIOLATIONS

A Chelmsford man has been fined $2,050 after pleading guilty to angling with too many lines, obstructing and making a false statement to conservation officers.

 

The man from Chelmsford, was fined $1,000 for obstructing conservation officers, $ 250 for making a false statement to conservation officers and $ 800 for angling through the ice with 8 extra lines.  The man’s filleting knife and camera was returned to him, but all other fishing equipment seized during the investigation was permanently forfeited to the Crown.
                                                          
On April 6, 2008, Ministry of Natural Resources Chapleau District conservation officers came in contact with the man on snowmobiles on Opeepeesway Lake east of Chapleau.  The Officers observed the man angling through the ice using a total of 10 lines. All of the lines in possession where baited with live minnows and hooks capable of catching fish.  During the course of the investigation, while the officers were gathering the evidence, the man obstructed the officers by burning off two ice fishing lines with his cigar amber and therefore destroying evidence pertinent to the case.  The man also made several false statements during his contact with the officers.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Chapleau, May 14, 2008.

 

 

May 2008
$1,000 FINE FOR DEPOSITING MATERIAL ON CROWN LAND
The owner of a Vermilion Bay commercial tourist camp has been fined $1,000 for depositing material on Crown land without a permit.

 

The camp owner plead guilty under the Public Lands Act.

 

Between March 1, 2002 and October 16, 2003, many truck-loads of sand and gravel were deposited on Crown land next to the camp in an effort to improve the camp’s boat storage area and expand the septic field.  Ministry of Natural Resources Dryden District conservation officers investigated the offence and laid charges.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Dryden, May 20, 2008.

 

 

May 2008
$2,000 FINE FOR ILLEGAL DEER HUNTING
A Wabigoon man has been fined $2,000 after pleading guilty to a variety of hunting offences.

 

The man was fined $1,000 for careless hunting, $500 for providing false information to a conservation officer and $500 for illegal possession of a deer.  He has been banned from hunting for one year and must take and pass the Hunter Education course before applying for a hunting licence.  The deer was forfeited to the Crown.  His firearm will be returned after the fines are paid.

 

On October 27, 2007, the man was deer hunting east of Dryden when he spotted a deer in the front yard of a home.  He shot and killed the deer, dragged it off the property, gutted it down the road and loaded it into his vehicle. 

 

Ministry of Natural Resources Dryden District conservation officers were called to the scene and witnesses identified the man as a possible suspect.  The officers spoke with the man at his home and at first he provided a false story about the harvested deer in his possession.  However, after officers presented him with evidence they had collected, he confessed.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Dryden, on May 20, 2008.

 

 

May 2008
FIVE YEAR FISHING BAN FOR SELLING WALLEYE
A Rocky Bay man has been fined $1,900 for illegal commercial fishing.

 

The man has been fined $1,500 for selling fish without the authority of a licence and $400 for making a false statement to a conservation officer.   He has been banned from commercial fishing for five years.  He has also been banned from fishing for any purpose in Ombabika Bay or the waters flowing into Ombabika Bay for five years.

 

After a lengthy investigation, Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers found that the man had sold walleye caught in Ombabika Bay of Lake Nipigon in 2006, although he knew the bay had been closed to commercial fishing since 1996.  When questioned by officers, the man claimed that the fish were for his personal use. 

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Thunder Bay, on May 22, 2008.

 

 

May 2008
TASTE FOR CAVIAR LEADS TO HIGH FINES

Two Toronto men have been fined $20,000 for fishing violations related to the illegal harvest of a sturgeon and the purchase and transport of sturgeon eggs.


The man from Richmond Hill, plead guilty to unlawfully buying and transporting sturgeon eggs and was fined $15,000.  The second man from Thornhill, plead guilty to fishing without a licence and unlawfully transporting sturgeon eggs; he was fined $5,000. In addition to the fines, both men have been prohibited from possessing a fishing licence for one year and were placed on probation and must not commit any similar violations for a period of two years.


Court heard that on November 22, 2007, the two men were checked by a Conservation Officer while transporting two large sturgeon caught in Blind River. The man from Thornhill did not have a valid fishing licence. During an inspection of the Thornhill man’s vehicle, a cooler containing almost 18 pounds of fresh sturgeon eggs was found, which the man from Richmond Hill admitted he had purchased.


The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Sudbury, on May 13, 2008.

 

 

May 2008
THREE MISSISSAGI FIRST NATION MEN RECEIVE FISHING PROHIBITIONS
Three men received a four-year fishing prohibition on the Mississagi River for illegally selling lake sturgeon to a local fish market.

 

Two of the men both received a lake sturgeon fishing prohibition for the Mississagi River ¬and within one kilometre of the mouth of the Mississagi River on the north shore of Lake Huron.

 

A third man received a lake sturgeon fishing prohibition for commercially fishing in the same waters.

 

Court heard that in June and July of 2005, the men sold lake sturgeon that were caught in the Mississagi River to a local fish market. 

 

The Mississagi First Nation is the holder of an Aboriginal Communal Fishing Licence and is permitted to fish commercially on the north shore of Lake Huron, but not in the Mississagi River.  The ministry was able to undertake the investigation with the help of the Mississagi First Nation, who wished to ensure the protection of the resource.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Blind River, on April 28, 2008. The court expressed concerns over the fishing of lake sturgeon on the Mississagi River during sturgeon spawning season.

 

 

 

April 2008
$7,000 FINE FOR HUNTING AND ABANDONING MOOSE

A Ministry of Natural Resources canine unit played a key role in convicting five Sudbury men for hunting and abandoning a bull moose.

 

One man was fined $500 for hunting moose without a licence, $500 for hunting a bull moose without a validation tag and $500 for abandoning animal meat that is suitable for food. He was also fined $1,000 for making a false statement to a conservation officer. The court also suspended his moose licence for one year.

 

Two other men plead guilty and were fined $500 for each count of abandoning animal meat that is suitable for food, possessing illegally killed wildlife and making a false statement to a conservation officer.

 

A fourth man plead guilty and was fined $500 for each count of possessing illegally killed wildlife and making a false statement to a conservation officer.   A fifth man plead guilty to making a false statement to a conservation officer and was fined $500.
 
On October 8, 2007, the men were hunting on the Chain Lake Road in Wildlife Management Unit 42 when they shot a bull moose and then had a friend drag it out of the bush with an all-terrain vehicle. Sudbury District conservation officers patrolling the area arrived as the moose was being transported. Two of the men fled the scene after hiding the bull moose in the bush. The rest of the hunting party denied any knowledge. The canine team helped recover evidence from the kill site. The ministry was able to recover the bull moose before it spoiled and donated the meat to charity.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Sudbury, on April 8th, 2008.

 

 

April 2008
$3,400 IN FINES FOR ACCESS VIOLATIONS

Eight men and one woman have been fined $3,400 for violating access restrictions to a lake in the Nakina area.

 

Five residents from Nakina – plead guilty and were each fined $400.

 

Three Minnesota men were convicted and fined in absentia – the first from Minneapolis, was fined $100; a second man from Rochester, was fined $100, and a third resident of Rosemont, was fined $400.

 

The resident from Orillia, plead guilty to two counts and was fined $800. 

 

The offenders were fined under the Public Lands Act for disobeying a sign.

 

The Ministry of Natural Resources received numerous complaints from the public about people disobeying a restriction sign at the Marshall Lake access, located 70 kilometres northwest of Nakina.  The Marshall Lake access is restricted to the use of motorized vehicles from May 1 to October 31 to protect and maintain a remote quality fishery.   Conservation officers laid charges after monitoring the access point from June 2007 to October 2007.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Geraldton, on April 22, 2008.

 

 

April 2008
$5,000 FINE FOR CARELESS HUNTING

A Geraldton man has been fined $5,000 for unsafe hunting.

 

The man, who was not present at his trial, was convicted under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act.

 

On April 29, 2007, the man was driving on Highway 11 west of Geraldton with his two young sons and a dog, when he saw a moose along the bush line.  An oncoming transport truck driver saw the man pull his vehicle to the shoulder of the road, leaving the rear of his vehicle on the highway.  As the truck driver passed the man, he heard a gunshot from the man’s vehicle.

 

The truck driver called 911 and Greenstone OPP arrived at the man’s vehicle.  The OPP notified Ministry of Natural Resources Geraldton conservation officers for further investigation.  At trial, evidence showed that the man had cut his shotgun shells to form makeshift slugs, a practice which could cause the gun to malfunction and blow up.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Geraldton on April 22, 2008.

 

 

April 2008
MAN GOING TO JAIL FOR NOT PAYING TIMBER THEFT FINE

An Ottawa man, who failed to make any payments on a $50,000 fine he received for timber theft in 2004, has been sentenced to 30 days in jail and ordered to make arrangements to pay his original fine.

 

The man was convicted in September of 2004 for illegally harvesting several hundred trees from a Crown Forest next to his property in Greater Madawaska, and ordered to pay $50 000.00 to Ontario’s Forest Futures Fund.

 

He has been sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined an additional $1,000 on a new conviction of failing to comply with his 2004 probation order. Under this new conviction, the man must make arrangements to pay his $50,000 fine within one year.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Pembroke, March 31, 2008.

 

 

April 2008
LARGE FINE FOR OVER LIMIT OF RAINBOW TROUT

A Toronto man has been fined $5,000 after pleading guilty to having more fish than allowed.

 

The man also had his fishing licence suspended for two years and forfeited the fish and four coolers to the Crown after being found with 84 rainbow trout over the legal limit.

 

On January 20, 2008, a Ministry of Natural Resources District  conservation officer stopped a vehicle which was being driven by the man as he was leaving Depot Harbour, a popular rainbow trout fishing area.  Inspection of the vehicle found four coolers and a garbage bag containing the rainbow trout.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Parry Sound on April 8, 2008.

 

 

April 2008
FINES AND PROBATION FOR UNLAWFULLY KEEPING WILDLIFE

A Bracebridge area man was convicted of unlawfully keeping wildlife in captivity.

 

The man plead guilty to unlawfully keeping two wild turkeys and two wolves without authorization under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act.  He was fined $2,000, given a one-year probation and ordered to repay $500 to the Ministry of Natural Resources to partially cover the cost of caring for animals seized from his facility.

 

Court heard that the ministry entered the man’s property in Utterson with a search warrant on September 19, 2007, and removed a number of live game wildlife.  The man had acquired and was keeping these animals without approval.  On October 5, 2007, a court in Huntsville granted the ministry permanent forfeiture of the wildlife.  The ministry released the wild turkeys and placed the other animals at properly authorized facilities.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Bracebridge, on April 8, 2008.

 

 

April 2008
HAMILTON COMPANY FINED $9,000 AND PUT ON PROBATION FOR SAFETY VIOLATIONS

A Hamilton company has been fined $9,000 and put on 12 months probation for safety violations.

 

The company has been fined $2,000 for not having well identification, $2,000 for not having storage tank identification and $5,000 for not having containment dikes around storage tanks, on three of the company’s natural gas well sites in Norfolk County.

 

The company has also been ordered to comply with provincial and federal standards.  The company operates 93 natural gas wells sites in Norfolk and Haldimand Counties.
 
The case was heard in Provincial Offences Court, Simcoe, April 15, 2008.

 

 

April 2008
NORTH BAY MAN FINED FOR BUILDING ILLEGAL DAM

A North Bay man has been fined for building a dam on Papineau Lake near Mattawa.

 
The man was convicted under the Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act for building the dam without a permit.

 
On August 5, 2007, the man attempted to plug a hole in an existing illegal dam at the out-flow of Papineau Lake. The hole had earlier been created by the Ministry of Natural Resources to help slowly lower the water level of the lake prior to the complete removal of the illegal structure.


The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, North Bay, on March 27, 2008.

 


April 2008
$1,400 FINE FOR SNOWMOBILE OFFENCES

Two Timmins area men have been fined $1,400 for snowmobile offences.

 

A man from South Porcupine, was fined $1,200 and a second man from Connaught, was fined $200. The first man plead guilty to operating his snowmobile while his driver’s licence was suspended and both men pleaded guilty to operating their snowmobiles without insurance.

 

On January 17, 2008, a Ministry of Natural Resources Timmins District conservation officer checked the men operating their snowmobiles near Ice Chest Lake Road in Evelyn Township and discovered the offences.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Timmins, March 27, 2008.

 


April 2008
$7,500 FINE FOR CARELESS HUNTING
Three Vermont hunters have been fined $7,500 for careless hunting in the Kenora area.

 

One man from Glover, Vermont and two men from West Glover, were each fined $2,500 after pleading guilty under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act. They are banned from hunting in Ontario for a year. They must complete the Hunter Education course and pass the exam in either Ontario or Vermont before applying for an Ontario hunting licence. Two deer were forfeited to the Crown. Their rifles will be returned once the fines are paid.

 

On October 21, 2007, the three men were driving on the Muriel Lake Road. As they approached the Highway 596 intersection, two of the men got out of their vehicle and shot across Highway 596 at a deer in a field. The three men then entered the field, which was private property, and shot at a second buck. Both deer were killed. Ministry of Natural Resources Kenora District conservation officers investigated the incident after they received complaints from the public.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Kenora, March 27, 2008.

 


April 2008
$2,000 FINE FOR ILLEGAL CABIN ON CROWN LAND
A Geraldton man has been fined $2,000 for unlawfully constructing a building on Crown land without a work permit.

 

The man plead guilty under the Public Lands Act.

 

On March 12, 2004, Ministry of Natural Resources Geraldton Area conservation officers received a complaint from the public that a cabin was being built on the west shore of Ogoki Lake north of Nakina. When the officers investigated the incident, they found that the man was building without a work permit and charges were laid.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Thunder Bay on April 8, 2008.

 


April 2008
$1,000 FINE FOR HARVESTING BAITFISH IN WRONG LAKE
An Upsala commercial baitfish harvester was fined $1,000 after pleading guilty to trapping baitfish in another harvester’s licence area.

 

On May 15, 2007, a baitfish harvester and a person helping him discovered 30 baitfish traps set in a lake about 100 kilometres northwest of Thunder Bay. They encountered the man, who was licensed to harvest an adjacent baitfish area, as he arrived to empty his illegal traps.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Thunder Bay on April 2, 2008.

 


April 2008
$1,250 FINE FOR FISHING VIOLATIONS
A Minnesota man has been fined $1,250 after pleading guilty to possessing and transporting an over-limit of walleye.

 

A resident from Duluth, has been fined $1,000 for the walleye over-limit and $250 for transporting fish unlawfully taken. The fish have been forfeited to the Crown. The man’s fishing rods, depth sounder and other fishing gear will be returned when he has paid the fine.

 

On February 19, 2008, a Ministry of Natural Resources Thunder Bay District Conservation Officer stopped two men on snowmobiles on the Sag Road near Saganagons Lake just outside of Quetico Provincial Park. When the men told the officer that they had been fishing, he asked to check their fish and discovered the man had four walleye over 46 centimetres (cm) in length. Under the regulations in the area where he was fishing, the man was allowed a daily catch limit of two walleye of which one could be greater than 46 cm.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Thunder Bay on April 2, 2008.

 


April 2008
$1,000 FINE FOR FAILING TO PAY COMMERCIAL FISH ROYALTIES
A Thunder Bay man has been fined $1,000 for failing to pay commercial fish royalties to the Ministry of Natural Resources.

 

The man plead guilty under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act. He was also put on probation for 15 days and is required to pay the royalties he owes in full during that time.

 

On November 30, 2007, a Ministry of Natural Resources Upper Great Lakes Enforcement Unit conservation officer was notified that the man had failed to pay royalties that he owed to the Ontario Commercial Fisheries’ Association. The man had failed to pay $4,125.90 to the association from February 28, 2005 to November 30, 2007. The Ontario Commercial Fisheries’ Association is the royalty administrator for the Ministry of Natural Resources.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Thunder Bay, on March 5, 2008.

 


April 2008
$1,000 FINE FOR ROTTEN DEER MEAT
A Golden, Colorado man has been fined $1,000 for allowing the flesh of a game animal that was hunted to become unsuitable for human consumption.

 

The man, who owns recreational cottage property in Godson Township in the Nestor Falls area, plead guilty under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act. He has also been banned from hunting for a year.

 

On November 7, 2007, the man killed a buck deer in Matthieu Township in Wildlife Management Unit 7B. He did not gut the deer because he did not have knives with him. He retrieved the deer the next morning but didn’t gut it until early evening. When Ministry of Natural Resources Kenora District conservation officers inspected the deer on November 9, 2007, the meat smelled bad and the interior cavity had turned green.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Kenora on March 27, 2008.

 


April 2008
$1,200 FINE FOR LYING AND HAVING LOADED FIREARM IN VEHICLE
A former Sioux Lookout man has been fined $800 for lying to a conservation officer and $400 for having a loaded firearm in a vehicle.

 

The man from Winnipeg, Manitoba, plead guilty under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act. The Crown seized the rifle, which will be returned to him once he pays the fine.

 

On October 29, 2006, Ministry of Natural Resources Sioux Lookout District conservation officers checked him as he was driving on Highway 516 north of Sioux Lookout. The officers asked him if he had firearms in the vehicle. The man told the officers he had a rifle, which turned out to be loaded after the officers inspected it.

 

The man told the officers that he had been to a recently logged area to check on equipment for his boss. The officers checked with a forestry company in the area and learned that the man’s employer had not worked for the company in months. The officers also inspected the area and found no operations or equipment.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Thunder Bay, on April 8, 2008.

 


April 2008
ALCOHOL AND FIREARMS DON’T MIX
A Quebec man has been fined $1,200 for careless handling of a firearm and having open liquor in a vehicle.

 

The resident of Dupuy, pleaded guilty and forfeits a rifle and ammunition.

 

Conservation officers stopped the man near Cochrane around 8:30 p.m. on September 23, 2007. It was dark outside. The man was driving and a young person and a minor were passengers. Conservation officers found an unencased .22 rifle and ammunition in the vehicle violating regulation. The officers also found a partial case of beer. The man and the youth each had an open bottle of beer.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Cochrane, on March 20, 2008.

 

 

 

  

March 2008
STURGEON AQUACULTURE OPERATION FINED $5,000

A Mississauga man has been fined $5,000 for illegally raising Siberian sturgeon.

 

The man was convicted under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act of operating an aquaculture operation without a licence.  In addition to the fines, he is prohibited for 18 months from importing or possessing Siberian sturgeon for commercial purposes.

 

Court heard that the man imported 120,000 fertilized Siberian sturgeon eggs from a supplier in Italy between March 2003 and March 2004.  He raised the sturgeon at hatcheries in Thornhill and Lindsay.  On September 23, 2005, conservation officers from the Ministry of Natural Resources seized 1,636 Siberian sturgeon and laid charges.

 

The Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act prohibits the aquaculture of non-native species to protect native fish species, such as lake sturgeon.
 
The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Newmarket, March 3, 2008.

 

 

March 2008
FINED FOR TOO MANY FISH AND SNOWMOBILE OFFENCES

Two Iroquois Falls men have been fined $2,375 for numerous natural resource violations including lying to conservation officers.

 

The two men plead guilty to having more walleye than allowed, having more walleye longer than 46 centimetres (cm) than allowed, failing to stop for conservation officers and failing to produce proof of insurance for their snowmobiles. One of the men also plead guilty to fishing without a licence and not having a registration sticker on his snow machine. Both men were also issued tickets for failing to stop for conservation officers and for not wearing helmets on their snowmobiles.

 

On February 2, 2008, The two men were leaving Lake Abitibi near Cochrane when conservation officers tried to stop them. The men fled but were eventually stopped and claimed they only had two walleye. The officers checked the trail that the two had taken to avoid being stopped and found another nine walleye – six of which were longer than 46 cm. The limit for walleye in that area is four per person with only one longer than 46 cm.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Cochrane, on March 20, 2008.

 


March 2008
SHOOTING AT FAKE MOOSE COSTS $6,000
Two southern Ontario hunters, who shot at a bull moose decoy, have been fined $3,000 each.

 

The two men plead guilty under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act to shooting from a motor boat and hunting a bull moose without a validation tag. They are banned from hunting for a year and their weapons, boat and motor have been seized until the fines are paid.

 

On October 14, 2007, conservation officers from the Ministry of Natural Resources Red Lake District saw the two men shooting at a bull moose decoy from their boat on Longlegged Lake, 40 kilometres southwest of Red Lake. When the officers caught the men they found they only had calf moose tags. The men claimed to be part of a hunting party which had several bull moose tags, but they had no way to communicate with the other party members and they’d also exceeded the maximum distance allowed for party hunting.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Red Lake on February 13, 2008.

 


March 2008
$1,000 FINE FOR ILLEGAL TRANSFER OF DEER LICENCE
Two American hunters have been fined $1,000 for illegally transferring a deer licence.

 

A man from Taylorville, North Carolina, and a man from Florence, South Carolina, were fined $500 each after pleading guilty under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act.

 

On November 8, 2007, Ministry of Natural Resources Kenora District conservation officers checked the man from Taylorville and three other non-resident deer hunters in the Witch Bay Road area. The officer discovered that the man from Taylorville had an unused deer seal and a non-resident Ontario deer licence which belonged to the man from Florence, who had already returned to the United States.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Kenora on February 28, 2008.

 

 

March 2008
$1,000 FINE FOR TRESPASSING TO HUNT DEER
Two North Carolina men have been fined $1,000 for trespassing on private property to hunt deer.

 

A man from Wilkesboro, and a man from Piney Creek, were fined $500 each after pleading guilty under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act. They forfeited the remains of the deer to the Crown.

 

On October 27, 2007, the two men went onto private property in Kirkup Township that was clearly marked with “no hunting” signs. They shot a deer and removed it even when a neighbour confronted them and told them they weren’t allowed to hunt there. A Ministry of Natural Resources Kenora District conservation officer talked with the men who said they thought the property that was under hydro lines, was public and open to legal hunting.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Kenora on February 28, 2008.

 


March 2008
$3,000 FINE FOR CARELESS HUNTING
A Longbow Lake man has been fined $3,000 for careless hunting after the apprentice hunter he was mentoring violated the rules.

 

The man plead guilty under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act. He was banned from hunting for a year and must successfully complete the Ontario Hunter Education course before he can apply for another hunting licence.

 

On November 24, 2007, the man and a 14-year-old apprentice hunter were driving along Highway 71 near Rushing River Provincial Park when they saw an antlered deer. The apprentice hunter got out of the vehicle and shot and hit the deer as it crossed a highway and headed into the park. The apprentice then got back into the truck without unloading the rifle. Both actions were violations of regulations.

 

A Treaty 3 police officer saw what happened and called Ministry of Natural Resources Kenora District conservation officers to investigate.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Kenora, on February 28, 2008.

 


March 2008
FINED $1,000 FOR LITTERING

A Geraldton-area woman has been fined $1,000 for littering on public land.

 

The woman from Aroland, was found guilty at a trial which she did not attend.

 

Court was told that a Ministry of Natural Resources Nipigon District conservation officer found leftovers from a restaurant meal in a shopping bag at a fishing access location at Murkey Creek, 20 kilometres south of Nakina. Information in the litter indicated that it belonged to the woman. She later admitted to leaving the litter there.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Geraldton on February 26, 2007.

 


March 2008
BROTHERS FINED $1,500 FOR HUNTING DURING OFF SEASON
Two Americans have been fined $1,500 for hunting white-tailed deer out of season in the Kenora area.

 

A man from Pequot Lakes, Minnesota, and a second man from Edinburg, New York, were fined $750 each after pleading guilty under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act. The Crown seized their firearms and three tree stands until the fines are paid.

 

On October 27, 2007, a Ministry of Natural Resources Kenora District conservation officer stopped the men as they hunted on the Stewart Road system in Wildlife Management Unit 5. There is no open season for deer for non-resident hunters in that unit.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Kenora on February 28, 2008.

 

  


February 2008
MEN FINED FOR HELPING WITH ILLEGAL MOOSE KILL
SAULT STE. MARIE – Three men from Sault Ste. Marie were fined $850 after helping another person who illegally killed a cow moose.

 

Two of the men plead guilty and were fined $250 each for making a false statement to a conservation officer. One of the first men charged and the third man also plead guilty to transporting illegally killed wildlife and were fined $250 and $100 respectively. The cow moose was forfeited to the Crown.

 

The court was told that on October 15, 2006, a Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officer at a check station stopped two men who were transporting a cow moose and a bull moose in their vehicle. One of the men told the officer that he shot the bull moose and his brother shot the cow moose and both were being claimed under the authority of a Métis right to harvest. The officer questioned a third man, who was in another vehicle, and he made the same statement.

 

The Ministry’s conservation officers investigated further and determined that the statements provided were false and that the cow moose was actually shot by another person who did not have an adult cow moose validation tag. Charges are still before the court relating to the bull moose and another cow moose taken by the party.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Sault Ste. Marie, on February 7, 2008.

 

 

February 2008
FINED $5,000 FOR LETTING MOOSE SPOIL
GOGAMA — Two Sudbury men have been fined $5,000 for allowing moose meat to spoil.

 

The two men both plead guilty to allowing most of an adult cow moose and a calf moose to spoil.

 

Court heard that on October 6, 2007, the men were hunting on the Nabakwasi Road in Wildlife Management Unit 29 when they shot a cow and a calf moose but didn’t take proper care of the animals after harvesting them, which allowed much of the meat to spoil.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Gogama, on February 25, 2008.

 


February 2008
COMPANY PAYS FOR WORKING ON SHORELANDS WITHOUT PERMIT
SAULT STE. MARIE — A company in Goulais River has been fined $500 for doing shore work without a permit.

 

The owner of a contracting company plead guilty to dredging shorelands without a permit contrary. In addition to the fine, the company repaired the site at the direction of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans shortly after the dredging was discovered.

 

The court was told that on August 27, 2007, the Ministry of Natural Resources received numerous complaints from the public that there was a large silt plume in Lake Superior running the length of Lakeshore Drive west of Sault Ste. Marie. A Ministry conservation officer went to the site and found a large excavator at the edge of the water and a pile of red clay in the water that appeared to be the source of the plume.

 

The ministry reminds the public that in most cases it is illegal to dredge or fill along the shores of lakes or rivers without getting ministry approval. In addition to fines, violators are often ordered to restore the area at their own expense.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Sault Ste. Marie, on February 7, 2008.

 


February 2008
TRAVEL ON CLOSED ROAD RESULTS IN HIGH TOLL
 

BLIND RIVER — An Iron Bridge man has been fined $200 for travelling twice on a Crown road that was closed to motorized vehicles.

 

The man was convicted of the first offence and plead guilty to the second offence.

 

The court heard that on September 26, 2007, a Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officer saw the man travelling on the Demorest Road, north of Iron Bridge. The Demorest Road is closed to motorized vehicles to protect remote tourism values in the area. On November 14, 2007, he was again seen by a conservation officer travelling on the closed road.

 

The ministry may prohibit the use of some roads on Crown land to protect important fish or wildlife habitat or remote tourism values in an area. Only a small number of roads are affected by these closures. For more information on road closures in your area, please contact your local Ministry of Natural Resources office.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Blind River, February 13, 2008.

 


February 2008
ATV USE ON CLOSED LAND PROVES COSTLY
SIMCOE — Two London men who used all-terrain vehicles (ATV) in a closed area of the St. Williams Crown lands in Norfolk County have been fined $350 each.

 

The two men were convicted under the Public Lands Act. Charges against a third man will be heard at a later date.

 

Court was told that a Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officer was patrolling the area in November 2007 when he saw three people on ATVs in an area clearly posted with “no vehicles” signs.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Simcoe, on February 28, 2008.

 

The St. Williams Crown lands support critical habitat for threatened and endangered plant and animal species.

 


February 2008
$6,500 FINE FOR CATCHING TOO MANY WALLEYE
ST. THOMAS— A Port Stanley commercial fisher has been fined $ 6,500 for exceeding the walleye quota on his commercial fishing licence.

 

A licensed commercial fisher on Lake Erie, was convicted for exceeding the assigned walleye quota on his 2007 licence by 5,226 lbs.

 

The commercial fisher advised a Port Officer that he was over quota and that a transfer request had been submitted. The non-compliance with the assigned quota was turned over to a conservation officer for investigation. The investigation revealed that in August of 2007 the commercial fisher landed fish on 3 occasions after reaching his assigned quota. The assigned quota had been exceeded by 5,226 lbs.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, St. Thomas, February 1, 2008.

 

Lake Erie management staff and conservation officers routinely monitor the commercial fishing industry to protect Lake Erie’s fishery resources that are managed through an international partnership with the US Great Lakes States and Ontario.

 

 

February 2008
HEFTY $10,600 FINE FOR HAVING TOO MANY FISH
THUNDER BAY — A Thunder Bay man has been fined $10,600 for having a lot more fish than allowed.

 

The man was fined $6,000 for having 30 walleye over the legal limit and $4,600 for having 23 brook trout over the legal limit and forfeits the fish to the Crown.

 

During a police investigation in January 2006, an OPP officer discovered a lot of fish in the freezers at the man’s residence. The officer seized the fish and turned it over to a Ministry of Natural Resources Thunder Bay District conservation officer. After investigating, the conservation officer laid charges against the man and the other occupant of the home. At a trial in November 2006, they were each fined $4,200, but both of the accused successfully appealed and got a new trial.

 

At the new trial on February 6, 2008, the man claimed that the fish belonged to a First Nation person, but was unable to produce that person for questioning at trial. The man was convicted. The Crown withdrew charges against the second person.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice in Thunder Bay.

 

The ministry reminds the public that fishing regulations are in place to ensure the sustainability of the fishery so that anglers may enjoy the resource in the future.

 


February 2008
FINED $1,000 FOR KEEPING LYNX AS PET
THUNDER BAY — A Thunder Bay man has been fined $1,000 for keeping a lynx as a pet.

 

The man plead guilty under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act. The female lynx was spayed and declawed before she was seized, so the animal cannot be returned to the wild. Instead she will go a wildlife facility in Wisconsin.

 

Court was told that in February 2007, the man contacted the Ministry of Natural Resources Thunder Bay District office and asked if it was legal to keep a lynx in captivity. He was told that it was illegal under both the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act and the City of Thunder Bay bylaws.

 

In the fall of 2007 ministry conservation officers received information that a man was keeping a lynx as a pet at a home in Thunder Bay. Officers went in with a search warrant and seized a young female lynx. DNA testing by the Rocky Mountain Research Station Wildlife Genetics Laboratory in Missoula, Montana, determined the animal was a Canada lynx.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Thunder Bay, on February 6, 2008.

 

The ministry reminds the public that, in addition to the safety risks associated with having a wild animal as a family pet, in most situations it is illegal to keep live game wildlife or specially protected wildlife in captivity except under the authority of a licence.

 


February 2008
LOCAL ANGLER FINED AGAIN AND BANNED FROM FISHING
SAULT STE. MARIE — A repeat natural resource violator has been fined $800.00 for fishing violations.

 

A man from Heyden, was convicted of trespassing and failing to produce his fishing licence. He is banned from fishing in Ontario for two years and forfeits his fishing equipment. If he does not pay his fines within a year, the fishing ban may be extended.

 

Court was told that on June 5, 2007, a conservation officer received two complaints that people were trespassing on the CN railway bridge at the St. Marys rapids in Sault Ste. Marie.

 

The man did not have his fishing licence with him but claimed he had bought one. He failed to produce it even when an officer gave him time. This was his second conviction for not having a fishing licence and the second for trespassing in the same location. He hadn’t paid previous fines either.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Provincial Court in Sault Ste. Marie on February 7, 2008.

 

Members of the public are reminded that trespassing on any of the railway bridges at the historic canal is both unsafe and illegal.

 

 

 

January 2008
FINED FOR SHOOTING WRONG MOOSE

IGNACE — An Ignace hunter has been fined $1,600 for shooting the wrong moose and for not wearing hunter orange.

 

The man was fined $1,500 for shooting a moose without a proper licence and $100 for not wearing hunter orange. He was also banned from hunting for eight months. He forfeited the moose to the Crown and it was donated to charity.

 

The court was told that on December 2, 2007, a Ministry of Natural Resources Dryden District conservation officer spoke to the man, who was parked on Highway 17, east of Ignace. The man told the officer that he may have made a mistake and shot the wrong moose. The officer inspected the surrounding area and found a large, mature, dead cow moose. The man only had a calf moose licence.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Ignace, on January 22, 2008.

 

The Ministry reminds hunters they must be sure of their target before shooting. Ontario’s selective harvest system is important for the long-term sustainability of the moose population.

 


January 2008
MAN FINED $3,000 FOR SNARING DEER
THUNDER BAY — A Lappe man has been fined $3,000 after pleading guilty to illegally snaring and killing a deer.

 

The man was fined $1,000 for killing a white-tailed deer by trap or baited line, $1,000 for making a false statement to a conservation officer, $500 for hunting white-tailed deer without a licence, $250 for possessing unlawfully killed game and $250 for possessing a body gripping trap. He was required to forfeit the deer and snares to the Crown and is also banned from hunting for five years.

 

The court was told that on March 4, 2007, Ministry of Natural Resources Thunder Bay District conservation officers received a tip from the MNR-TIPS line that a deer had been shot on the man’s property.

 

Officers went to the site and the man showed them a deer he initially claimed was a road kill. When officers investigated they found a hunting blind, a feed barrel and six wire snares set around the barrel. At this point, the man claimed the deer was shot with a crossbow by a First Nation man with treaty rights in the Thunder Bay area. Initially, the First Nation man corroborated his story, claiming he shot the deer, but an examination of the deer revealed it had been snared and then shot with a crossbow. The First nation’s man eventually admitted he had nothing to do with the killing of the deer.

 

The First Nation’s man was fined $500 on June 6, 2007 after pleading guilty to knowingly making a false statement to a conservation officer.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Thunder Bay, January 17, 2008.

 

The ministry reminds the public that it is illegal to snare big game animals. Provincial hunting regulations protect the sustainability of wildlife populations and give all hunters a fair opportunity to take part in the hunt.

 


January 2008
HEFTY FINES FOR BREAKING CROWN LAND CAMPING RULES
ESPANOLA — Five local residents have been fined a combined total of $2,075 for not complying with the free-use policy on Crown land camping.

 

They all plead guilty under the Public Lands Act and one of the residents was fined $1,500 on two counts.

 

Court was told that Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers noted the defendants had parked their trailers at remote lake access points in Poncet Township at different times in 2007. The trailers were still there more than 21 days later and at times left unattended and unoccupied overnight.

 

The case was heard at Ontario Court of Justice, Elliot Lake, January 16, 2008.

 

Access points were never designed or created for long-term camping stay and use. Campers are reminded that Ontario’s free-use policy regarding Crown land allows camping at one spot for 21 days, after which the camper must move to a new location.

 


January 2008
$4,000 FINE FOR THIRD CONVICTION FOR FLOATING COTTAGE OWNER
BARRIE – A Midland-area marine contractor has been convicted for the third time for illegally occupying Crown land with his floating cottage.

 

A contractor from Lafontaine, has been fined $4,000 and received two years probation for leaving his cottage in a bay for almost a month.

 

Court was told that on May 9, 2006, the man’s floating cottage was anchored at Beckwith Island off of Severn Sound. Despite instructions from Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers to remove the structure, the man left the cottage in that area until June 2, 2006. Ontario court rulings say the public right of navigation entitles the boating public to transient only.

 

In October 2003, he was convicted of illegally occupying Crown land in a provincial park after mooring his floating cottage for several weeks at Giant’s Tomb Island of Awenda Provincial Park. He was fined $3,000 and given 12 months probation. In the summer of 2004, he illegally moored his floating cottage in waters near Penetanguishene where it remained for over a year until a judge ordered him to remove it or have it forfeited to the Crown. The man was convicted again and was fined $5,000 and given an additional two-year’s probation.

 

The case was heard in October 2007 in the Ontario Court of Justice and the ruling was made in Barrie on January 9, 2008.

 

The Ministry would like to thank members of the public who assisted by reporting these violations.

 


January 2008
TORONTO-AREA MAN FINED FOR SHOOTING A TRUMPETER SWAN

ORILLIA – A Richmond Hill resident has been fined $2,500 for illegally hunting a trumpeter swan.

 

The man was fined $1,250 for illegally hunting a migratory game bird during the closed season and $1,250 for illegally possessing the carcass of a migratory game bird. As well, he can not obtain a migratory game bird hunting permit for one year.

 

The court was told that the man was waterfowl hunting on Lake Simcoe in Ramara Township on October 6, 2007, when he shot a trumpeter swan as it flew overhead. Another hunter, who had warned the man not to shoot at the trumpeter swan, got the man’s name and called the Ministry of Natural Resources tips line (TIPS-MNR) to report the incident.

 

There is no open season for swan hunting in Ontario. It is the hunter’s responsibility to be able to properly identify migratory game birds. The Wye Marsh Wildlife Centre has been working since 1980 to reintroduce trumpeter swans.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice in Orillia on January 15, 2008.

 


January 2008
TWO MEN FINED $3,000 FOR ILLEGALLY KILLING AND ABANDONING DEER

DRYDEN – Two men have been fined $3,000 for illegally hunting and abandoning white-tailed deer.

 

Two men from Fort Frances, were fined $500 each for hunting deer during the closed season and $1,000 each for abandoning meat suitable for food. They were also banned from hunting for one year.

 

Court was told the two men were hunting for cow moose on October 14, 2007, in Wildlife Management Unit 8, southwest of Dryden. They shot a buck deer, which they abandoned when they realized the deer season was closed. The meat spoiled. Ministry of Natural Resources Conservation Officers from Dryden, Fort Frances and Guelph, as well as a Conservation Officer from the Canine Unit, worked together on the investigation.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Dryden, on January 15, 2008.

 

Conservation Officers in Northwestern Ontario have found several deer and moose, which were shot and abandoned during the 2007 fall hunt season. The Ministry reminds people it is illegal to abandon wild game. Hunters should contact TIPS-MNR or a Conservation Officer immediately if they kill an animal by mistake.

 


January 2008
FINE FOR INTERNET SALE OF DEER ANTLERS
BELLEVILLE – A Frankford woman has been fined $1000 for selling antlers represented as white-tailed deer antlers.

 

The woman was convicted of selling an animal represented as game wildlife. Charges against the man were withdrawn.

 

The court heard that during the fall of 2005, the man won the Belleville Big Buck Contest for his archery-hunted white-tailed deer. During the fall of 2006, a set of antlers was auctioned on the internet site eBay through an account owned by the woman. The antlers were accompanied by photographs and were described as being from a white-tailed deer with the same weight as the winning entry from the contest in the previous year. A person in the United States bought the antlers. Peterborough District conservation officers investigated the sale. The owners claimed that the antlers were mule deer antlers that had been purchased on the Internet. They claimed to have fastened the antlers onto the body of a white-tailed deer and taken the photographs.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Belleville, on January 08, 2008.

 

The public is reminded that in most cases the sale of wildlife, including parts, is illegal in Ontario. Some sales are allowed with the proper licences. This helps ensure wildlife populations remain sustainable for the enjoyment of Ontario residents and visitors.

 


January 2008
$1200 FINE FOR ILLEGAL DEER HUNTING
PETERBOROUGH – A Douro–Dummer Township man has been fined $1200 on illegal deer hunting charges.

 

The man plead guilty to hunting deer during the closed season and transporting illegally killed wildlife.

 

Court was told that on December 4, 2007, Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers acted on a tip from the public and found a fresh deer kill site. They followed all-terrain vehicle tracks back to the man’s home, where he admitted shooting a deer with a muzzleloader on December 3. The muzzleloader hunt for deer in that area ended on November 17.

 

The case was heard at the Ontario Court of Justice, Peterborough, on January 10, 2008.

 

The ministry reminds the public that regulations are in place to protect hunters as well as the public and to help ensure the sustainability of wildlife populations.

 


January 2008
MAN FINED FOR CARELESS HUNTING
SUNDRIDGE – A Burk’s Falls-area man has been fined for deer hunting violations and forfeits his gun.

 

The man was fined $1,500 for careless hunting and $500 for having an illegally killed deer. He also cannot hunt again until he successfully completes a hunter education course.

 

Court was told that the man killed an antlerless deer on November 7, 2007, in the village of Sprucedale, without reasonable care where he was shooting. He also did not have an antlerless deer hunting licence. An area resident confronted the man and later called the Ontario Provincial Police. The police worked with the Ministry of Natural Resources to investigate the incident.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Sundridge, on January 10, 2008.

 

All new resident hunters in Ontario must successfully complete a Hunter’s Education Course and pass an exam before they can apply for a hunting licence. Conservation officers enforce legislation that helps to ensure the safety of the public and hunters while sustaining wildlife populations.

 


January 2008
TRAPPER FINED FOR HAVING SPECIES AT RISK
RED LAKE – An Ear Falls trapper has been fined $700 for illegally possessing a wolverine, an animal designated as “threatened” on the Species At Risk in Ontario list.

 

Court was told that the trapper sent a letter in late December 2006 to the Ministry of Natural Resources office in Red Lake indicating he had accidentally caught a wolverine in a wolf snare.

 

When ministry staff tried to investigate, the man was not co-operative and they were not able to determine if it was an accidental catch.

 

The ministry reminds trappers to report incidents like this to the local district manager within two days. If the ministry determines that snaring another species was an accident, a trapper would not likely be charged. The ministry would confiscate the wolverine and collect important biological data that is used to manage the wolverine and its habitat.

 

The case was heard in Ontario Court of Justice, Red Lake, August 3, 2007 and the ruling on January 10, 2008.

 


January 2008
ANGLER ON THE HOOK FOR OUT-OF-SEASON WALLEYE FISHING
CHAPLEAU – A Sault Ste. Marie area resident has been fined $2,400 for having walleye out of season.

 

The man plead guilty to catching and keeping 12 walleye before the 2007 opening of walleye season. He was also suspended from fishing for one year.

 

Court was told that he was camping on Kebskwasheshi Lake on May 18, 2007, when Ministry of Natural Resources Conservation Officers inspected his boat and coolers. Officers found 11 whole walleye and two walleye fillets.

 

The case was heard at the Ontario Court of Justice, Chapleau, on January 9, 2008.

 

Anglers are reminded to review the 2008-2009 Recreational Fishing Regulations Summary for information on catch and possession limits, and open seasons.

 


January 2008
OBSTRUCTION CHARGES PROVE COSTLY FOR AGGREGATE OPERATORS
CAYUGA – A Delhi man and his son have been found guilty of obstructing Ministry of Natural Resources aggregate resources inspectors on two separate occasions, while operating a quarry owned by the father and were fined $3,000.

 

On October 5, 2004, two inspectors responded to a complaint that a suspended quarry site was operating near Hagersville. The court was told that the inspectors were threatened and ordered off the quarry site before completing a site inspection.

 

On April 6, 2005, an inspector serving notice that the company’s licence had been revoked, had his vehicle blocked from leaving the quarry site by the owner’s son until an Ontario Provincial Police constable intervened.

 

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Cayuga, on January 4, 2008.

 

The Aggregate Resources Act provides for the management and regulation of aggregate operations to minimize environmental impact and ensure the rehabilitation of pits and quarries. The act provides for fines of up to $30,000 for each day on which an offence occurs or continues. Aggregate resources inspectors are authorized to enter pits and quarries to ensure compliance with the legislation.

To report a natural resources violation, call 1-877-TIPS-MNR (847-7667) toll-free any time or contact your local ministry office during regular business hours.

 

You can also call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).