What to do if you encounter a black bear while enjoying the outdoors

Bears usually avoid humans. But if you do encounter one, it's important to remember that they are powerful and potentially dangerous animals. If you are a hiker, cyclist, jogger, berry picker, or anyone who plans to spend some time in "bear country", there are some things you should do if you encounter a bear.

If you encounter a bear:

 

  • If the bear is not paying any attention to you, slowly and quietly back away while watching the bear to make sure it isn't following you
  • Do not approach the bear to get a better look
  • If the bear obviously knows you are there, raise your arms to let the bear know you are a human. Make yourself look as big as possible. Speak in a firm but non-threatening voice while looking at the bear and backing away
  • Watch the bear to gauge its reaction to you. Generally, the noisier the bear is, the less dangerous it is, providing you don't approach the bear. If a bear huffs, pops its jaw or stomps its paws on the ground, it wants you to back away and give it space
  • If a bear closely approaches you, drop any food you are carrying and continue backing up
  • If the bear continues to try to approach, stand your ground and be aggressive - use your whistle or air horn, yell, stand tall, wave your arms and throw objects
  • If a bear keeps advancing and is getting close, continue to stand your ground. Use your bear pepper spray and anything else to threaten or distract the bear - bears will often first test to see if it is safe to approach you
  • Do not run or climb a tree. Bears can run faster and climb better than you
  • If the bear makes contact, fight back with everything you have


If you are concerned, contact the local Ministry of Natural Resources office in the area you are going to visit to determine whether there have been any reports of bear encounters or conflicts.

 

 Download a PDF version of this fact sheet.

 

 

 

TO REPORT BEAR PROBLEMS: contact the Bear Reporting Line at:
1-866-514-2327  (TTY) 705 945-7641

In a life-threatening emergency, call your local police or 911.